Super moon and the possum

We waited with great excitement to see the Super moon rise in the east of our backyard. I was expecting something more spectacular, it was certainly bright, but not as large as I was hoping for. However as I stood outside in 1.5 degrees Celsius air, very chilly I must say, I managed to snap a photograph of someone I’ve been trying to get for a long time. Mr or Mrs Brush-tail possum. This very aptly named possum is about the size of a cat and makes all sorts of scary noises such as grunting and gargling, it lives off leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds, bird’s eggs and young birds. They particularly like the apple tree leaves and drive Ruby crazy as she patrols the garden.

They are not my favourite possums as they tend to break my plants and thump up and down on the roof all night. I prefer the smaller vegetarian Ring-tail possum. Still, it’s nice to see them as they are one of the few native animals that successfully share suburbia with us.

Sometimes they even like to move in to people’s houses. One summer night I could hear someone breaking in to our bedroom through the half opened window. I snapped on the light in terror and flung back the blind to see a possum half in and half out. My husband manfully held the blind against the window to keep the possum there, whilst I ran for rubber washing up gloves and a bucket to catch it in, which were not appreciated by my husband as suitable catching tools. Luckily the possum, removed himself and we closed the window; firmly.

winter super moon

The super moon rises in the east of our garden

possum

Mr or Mrs Brush-tail possum peeping out from the safety of the apple tree

ringtail

The little Ring-tail possum is about half the size of a cat

22 thoughts on “Super moon and the possum

  1. The super moon shinned through my bedroom blinds and put a spotlight on my backyard. Amazing! The tail on your possum is definitely bushy. The possum tails in my neck of the woods (Northern California) have to fur.

  2. Loved reading your story!๐Ÿ˜€ That’s a great photo of the little ring tail possum you took, he looks so cute and innocent! It’s hard to believe that such small, fluffy and cute little creatures can make so much noise and damages! ,-)

  3. Your second photo of the possum is fabulous! Our possums in the mid west of US are quite a bit uglier…dull, neutral colored and slick fur, no fur on the tail…they are not my favorite creatures. They are also not nice, especially to our cats. When we hear the cats screeching we know the possums are out…I feel horrible for our cats, but they love to live outdoors…and they’ve survived 10 years so far, so I guess they can handle themselves!

  4. Ohmygosh! love the story, thinking of you guys in the night and the brave fight against your intruder – rubber gloves – giggle. The photos tell a great story too, I like those glowing eyes, and those big ears.

  5. What bold creatures they are Jen ! and the rubber gloves scenario …๐Ÿ™‚
    Great pictures ! Never saw that super moon too darn cloudy . And no chnace of a posseum either .
    PS am sorry to be so late I ‘ve just had to rearrange my notifications everything seems a bit barmy on the WP reader lately ..๐Ÿ˜ฆ

  6. Ugh! Possums! Awful things, they kill all our lovely Kiwi and Weka – needs a judiciously applied truck if you ask me!

    Come to NZ and ship them all back, we have got MILLIONS of them – you Australians are quite used to boatloads of undesirables being transported from foreign countries aren’t you? That is, after all, how your nation was founded.

    • Well, historically I suppose both our countries have been given undesirables. I’m sure the Maoris weren’t thrilled with British Colonisation any more than the Australian Aboriginals were. Our convict undesirables probably weren’t thrilled to be here either! Going back to possums, apparently they were introduced to NZ by profiteering NZ colonists in order to establish a fur trade. If only those greedy colonists hadn’t imported them…..

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